PCS 2000: Introduction to PCS

 

This course is intended to provide a thorough understanding about issues related to peace and conflict.  

Meanings of peace, peace movements, reasons for wars (at the individual, group, state, decision-making  

and the ideological, social and economic levels), and the nature and significance of nuclear weapons will  

be explored.  Discussions will include how international and regional organizations cooperate with nation  

states in transforming conflict into building positive and negative peace.  Participants in this course will  

be encouraged to review additional resources in order to have a better understanding of the United States’  

role in peace and conflict issues, and to develop a global perspective on alternative solutions to international 

conflict and wars. A special attention will also be devoted to discuss the relevance of gender to peace and  

Conflict issues and the prospects for anthropology with a specific focus on Africa. 

 

PCS 2010 Special Topics: Modern Slavery and Human Trafficking - Dr. Eric J. Montgomery

 

This participatory interdisciplinary online course examines contemporary issues in globalization with focus on modern slavery and human trafficking. We are living in epic times, when the call for racial and economic equity has never been more pronounced. As human rights become center stage, human trafficking becomes a core issue throughout the world. The overall organizing framework for the class is to highlight the social, cultural, political, and economic causes of human trafficking, with an eye towards anthropology and sociology of slavery and sex work. The class will consider evidence that inequalities, especially structural poverty, exacerbate modern slavery worldwide. Students will develop skills in policy analysis, history of slavery, policy impact monitoring, and the ethnographic skills of the anthropologist. My own work on human trafficking in film and global health will be used as weekly frames. We will look at modern slavery through all of its guises, with particular attention toward “sex slavery” from a global, regional, and local trajectory. The books “Out of the Darkness” by Alice Jay and “Playing the Whore” by Melissa Grant are designed to provide a holistic perspective of sex trafficking and sex work from the individuals and survivors themselves. The “Human Trafficking: An Interdisciplinary Perspective” by Burke will serve as the textbook and guide the chronology of the course. Finally, we will examine the global workforce and the impact of widespread global migration as well as new collaborative networks that bridge artificial and real borders in a global world.   


PCS 2010 Special Topics: Conflicts and Disparities in Global Health - Dr. Eric J. Montgomery
  • Critically examine key issues and controversies in contemporary global health policy and delivery (e.g. priority setting, design of health systems, primary health care, equity considerations)  
  • Explain how epidemiology and burden of disease, socioeconomic, cultural, and structural factors influence the design of evidence-based policy and interventions.  
  • Critically evaluate case studies of indigenous/traditional medicine in Africa and India, analyzing some of the problems and promises. 
  • Learn and apply anthropological methods, namely ethnography, to better understand healthcare systems and delivery systems from throughout the globe.  
  • Analyze and apply frameworks for the effective delivery of health interventions and services to low-resource areas including public-sector, private-sector, and community channels and partnerships. Be comparative with examples from abroad.  
  • Develop skills in the assessment of policy and program impact for a number of contemporary topics in global health: COVID-19, AIDS, Ebola, FGM, refugee health, and more.  
  • Understand and apply concepts and ideas from peace and conflict studies 

 

PCS 2020: Science, Technology, and War - Dr. Alvin Saperstein & Dr. Eric J. Montgomery 

 

This course is concerned with the impact of human conflict on science, technology, and society and vice versa. It commences with a thorough understanding about issues related to the history of science, technology, and warfare in human. The course looks at warfare through the lenses of anthropology and physics with correlating perspectives from political science, history, the humanities, and international relations. The course commences by looking at the origins of the state and war, whether or not war is innate, the meanings of war and peace, types of warfare, reasons for wars (at the individual, group, state, decision-making and the ideological, social and economic levels), and the nature and significance of terrorism/counter-terrorism, technological developments, and nuclear weapons will also be explored.   

We will follow the outline of the text (Waging War (WW) by Wayne Lee) and look at cultures and technologies of warfare from 3500 BC up until the present, and also delve into regions and conflicts spanning the gamut of homo-sapiens history with conflict. The second half of the class looks at modern issues of warfare since 1930 including technological tools (computers/cyber), biological and chemical weapons, and vulnerabilities to critical infrastructure. Participants in this course will be encouraged to review additional resources (as well as corresponding weekly readings) to have a better understanding of the United States’ role in peace and conflict issues, and to develop a global perspective on alternative solutions to international conflict and wars. Wayne Lee’s “Waging War” offers us an inter-disciplinary approach to innovations in warfare throughout human history, while the supplemental readings (provided on Canvas under “Files” as well as with links in the syllabus). Our readings will encompass themes and trends regarding science, technology, and modern trends of conflict and warfare. 

This class takes as its basic premise that science and facts matter. In an era of increasingly complex political and military conflicts, which includes disturbing trends like international pandemics, the use of child soldiers, drones, and cyber warfare, it is essential for students and all citizens of the world to be aware of the causes and ramifications of such conflicts, the relationship between power, culture, and innovation, and the possibilities of effective resolution.  As an anthropologist, Montgomery will talk a lot of about cultural relativity as a means for combatting ethnocentrism and understanding the role of culture and history. Saperstein will offer a nuanced look at military history, technological innovation, and the “science” and history of warfare across time and space.  

 

PCS 2010 Special Topics: “Social Justice Activism - Barbara L. Jones

This course introduces various concepts of theoretical frameworks, key concepts, themes and critical analysis involved in social justice activism within social movements. Societal theories, political implications and historical roots of conflicts, injustice(s) are explored in this class. This course is aimed at defining social justice activism participation involving collective action, collective behavior, and collective identity of significant past, present and emerging social movements. 

 

 PCS 5000 Dispute Resolution - Jim Statham

THIS COURSE IS DESIGNED TO PROVIDE STUDENTS WITH TOOLS THEY CAN USE TO IMPROVE NOT ONLY THE QUALITY OF THEIR WORK LIFE BUT ALSO THE QUALITY OF THEIR PERSONAL LIFE.

IN THIS COURSE, AMONG OTHER SUBJECTS, WE DISCUSS BARRIERS TO COMMUNICATION AND HOW TO AVOID THEM, HOW TO RESPOND TO PEOPLE IN WAYS TO IMPROVE THE RECEIPT OF CONTINUING INFORMATION, ACTIVE LISTENING, PROBLEM SOLVING, NEGOTIATION STRATEGIES,ISSUE TYPES, INEREST BASED NEGOTIATIONS, ALONG WITH THE DIMENSIONS OF NEGOTIATION. THE COURSE ALSO DEALS WITH DIFFERENT FORMS OF ALTERNATIVE DISPUTE RESOLUTION THAT STUDENTS, IN ALL PROBABILITY, WILL ENCOUNTER IN THEIR LIVES SUCH AS VARYING FORMS OF ARBITRATION AND MEDIATION, AND HOW TO PREPARE FOR THEM.

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