Department of English
5057 Woodward Suite 9408
Detroit, MI 48202 United States
P: 313-577-2450
F: 313-577-8618

Shakespeare and His Culture on Stage and on the Page Conference Schedule

Date: 2/15/2016


Bringing together Shakespeare scholars from across Michigan, this conference will explore the cultural, historical, literary and textual significance of the First Folio by examining the presence of Shakespeare’s writings in three media: stage performance, manuscript, and print. As cultural and historical objects, the First Folio and Shakespeare’s other writings offer a rich corpus for considering Shakespeare in relation to various strands of early modern culture and society, such as class, the court, domesticity, economics, education, ethnicity, gender, history, nationhood, politics, popular culture, race, religion, sexuality and social hierarchy.

"Shakespeare and His Culture on Stage and on the Page"
Bernath Auditorium, David Adamany Undergraduate Library at Wayne State University.

Thursday, March 10th
12:30: Welcoming remarks, Ken Jackson (Chair, English Department at Wayne State)

12:45-1:45: Keynote—“The First Folio: Its Editing, Its Printing, and Its Textual History,” David Bevington (University of Chicago)

1:45-2:00: Break

2:00-3:30: Panel #1—Quartos, Folios, and Beyond: Shakespeare and Print
Moderator: Jaime Goodrich (Wayne State)
“Hamlet’s Accountability for the Deaths of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern in the Quarto and Folio Versions,” Stephen Deng (Michigan State University)
“Shakespeare, Jonson, Print, Coin,” Grace Tiffany (Western Michigan University)
“Pedagogies of Page and Performance: Shakespeare in Eighteenth-Century Education,” Lisa Maruca (Wayne State University)

3:30-3:45: Break

3:45-5:15: Panel #2—Embedded Shakespeare: Prayers, Proverbs, and Sonnets
Moderator: Jaime Goodrich (Wayne State)
“Shakespeare’s Prayers,” John Cox (Hope College)
“Posthuman Lear,” Craig Dionne (Eastern Michigan University)
“The First Folio Sonnets,” Beth Bradburn (Western Michigan University)

Friday, March 11th

9:00-10:00: Keynote—“Shakespeare and Innovation,” Mary Thomas Crane (Boston College)

10:00-10:15: Break

10:15-11:45: Panel #3—The World of the Stage: Shakespeare and Performance
Moderator: Arthur F. Marotti (Wayne State)
“The Politics of Attention in Shakespearean Tragedy,” Steven Mullaney (University of Michigan)
“Erotic Androgyny and Male-to-Female Crossdressing in Shakespeare’s Plays and Poems,” Simone Chess (Wayne State University)
“This Insubstantial Pageant: De-historicizing Shakespeare in Brazil,” José Garcez Ghirardi (FGV Direito SP)

11:45-1:30: Lunch

1:30-3:00: Panel #4—Wrestling with Interpretation: Shakespeare, Ethics, and Religion
Moderator: Jaime Goodrich (Wayne State)
“Bedlam Charity in King Lear,” Douglas Trevor (University of Michigan)
“‘Our bending author’ and his ‘Religion’ of Wrestling,” Mary Jo Kietzman (University of Michigan, Flint)
“Inside the Hermeneutic Circle: Cassius, Brutus, and Antony in Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar,” Dick Raspa (Wayne State University)

3:00-3:15: Break

3:15-4:45: Panel #5—“Not of an age, but for all time”: Shakespeare’s Later Reception
Moderator: Arthur F. Marotti (Wayne State)
“Killing Desdemona: Late 18th-century Etchings to Contemporary Comic Books,” J. Caitlin Finlayson (University of Michigan, Dearborn)
Hamlet/Haider in the Age of Terror,” Jyotsna G. Singh (Michigan State University)
“Stealth Shakespeare,” Linda Gregerson (University of Michigan)

This event is: Free and open to the public, with no reservation required

First Folio! The Book that Gave Us Shakespeare on tour from the Folger Shakespeare
Library, is a national traveling exhibition organized by the Folger Shakespeare Library in
Washington, DC, to commemorate the 400th anniversary in 2016 of Shakespeare’s death. It is produced in association with the American Library Association and the Cincinnati Museum Center. First Folio! The Book that Gave Us Shakespeare, on tour from the Folger Shakespeare Library, has been made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor, and by the support of Google.org, Vinton and Sigrid Cerf, and other generous donors.