Degree Requirements, MA and Ph.D. Programs in English, Wayne State University -- from the Graduate Bulletin, 2016-2018

 

Office: Room 9408, 5057 Woodward; 313-577-2450
Chairperson: Kenneth Jackson
Associate Chairperson: Lisa Maruca

Director of Composition: Jeff Pruchnic
Director of Graduate Studies: Caroline Maun

Academic Services Officer: Tia Finney
Website:
http://clas.wayne.edu/English

Professors

Ellen Barton, Walter F. Edwards, Jerry Herron, renée hoogland, Kenneth Jackson, Richard C. Marback, Geoffrey Nathan, Ljiljana Progovac, Richard Raspa, Martha Ratliff, John R. Reed, Michael H. Scrivener, Steven Shaviro, Barrett Watten

Associate Professors

Robert Aguirre, Sarika Chandra, Simone Chess, Jonathan Flatley, Jaime Goodrich, Donovan Hohn, Lisa Maruca, Caroline Maun, Jeff Pruchnic, Frances Ranney, Lisa Ze Winters

Assistant Professors

Hilary Fox, Chera Kee, John Patrick Leary, Donnie Johnson Sackey

Senior Lecturers

Todd Duncan, Margaret Jordan, Michael L. Liebler, Karen Springsteen, Thomas Trimble, Chris Tysh

Lecturers

Ryan Flaherty, Jared Grogan, Shenika Hankerson, Adrienne Jankens, Amy Latawiec, Joseph Torok, Nicole Varty, Clayton Walker

Lecturer and Director, Writing Center

Jule Wallis

Emeritus / Emerita Professors

Les Brill, Bradford S. Field, Jeanne A. Flood, Isabel Graham, Henry L. Golemba, Yates Hafner, William A. Harris, Julie Klein, Arthur F. Marotti, Ross Pudaloff, Ruth E. Ray, Alfred Schwarz, Edward Sharples, Elizabeth S. Sklar, Robert M. Strozier II, Anca Vlasopolos, Renata Wasserman, Beongcheon Yu

Graduate Degrees

MASTER OF ARTS with a major in English

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY with a major in English

The English Department is engaged in researching and reconceptualizing what it means to read and write English in the twenty-first century and invites energetic, intellectually adventurous students to join in this pursuit. The graduate program is designed for students who show promise in the formal study and teaching of language, literature, film, rhetoric, composition, and culture, and seek to pursue the Master of Arts and/or Doctor of Philosophy in these areas. The M.A. program can be used to prepare for doctoral work and/or as a terminal degree used to develop expertise in particular areas of study (e.g., professional writing, creative writing). The doctoral program provides focus for all graduate studies in English and ensures that students receive an education at the highest possible level. The Ph.D. curriculum is offered in three concentrations: Literary and Cultural Studies; Rhetoric and Composition Studies; and Film and Media Studies.

English (M.A. Program)

Admission to this program is contingent upon admission to the Graduate School; for requirements, see Admission, Graduate School. Formal application must be made through the Graduate Admission website. Application deadlines are October 15 (for Winter admission) and August 1 (for Fall admission).The English Department requires that all applicants provide the following on the Graduate Admissions Website: http://clas.wayne.edu/english

1. Statement of purpose

2. Two academic letters of reference

3. Sample essay from a previous English course

 

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

The Master of Arts degree is offered as a Plan A, Plan B or Plan C option.

Plan A: Thirty-three credits, including a three-to-six-credit thesis.

Plan B: Thirty-three credits, including a three-credit essay and demonstration of proficiency in at least one foreign language (for further details, consult the Director of Graduate Studies).

Plan C: Thirty-three credits, including a portfolio of representative work approved by the Director of Graduate Studies.

Major Requirements: The M.A. program in English is designed to prepare students to go on to doctoral work or to train students with specific interests (e.g., professional writing, creative writing) that may not lead to further advanced study in English. The M.A. program requires thirty-three credits of course work, which must include:

1) Five 7000-level courses in English at Wayne State University

2) English 7999 (Master’s Essay, three credits), ENG 8999 (Master’s Thesis, three to six credits), or the submission of a zero-credit portfolio. The thesis option is generally available only to students pursuing an interest in creative writing and working under the supervision of a creative writing faculty member. These options correspond to the Graduate School's Plans A, B, or C described above.

Academic Scholarship: All course work must be completed in accordance with the academic procedures of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and the Graduate School governing graduate scholarship and degrees: see the sections of this bulletin under Academic Regulations for the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and Academic Regulations, Graduate, respectively.

English (Ph.D. Program)

Admission to this program is contingent upon admission to the Graduate School; for requirements, see Admission, Graduate School. Formal applications must be submitted on the Graduate Admissions website: http://gradadmissions.wayne.edu. Students may apply to the Ph.D. program with either a B.A. or M.A. degree. Students that apply with a B.A. will have the opportunity to receive an M.A. degree before the completion of their Ph.D. by completing the M.A. requirements described above. The application deadline is December 15, but every Ph.D. student must begin the program in the fall semester. The English Department requires that all applicants provide the following information on the Graduate Admissions website:

1. Statement of purpose indicating areas of research interest

2. At least two academic letters of reference

3. A sample of the student's scholarly or critical writing

4. GRE General Test Scores

 

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

The Ph.D. program requires ninety credits of course work beyond the B.A. degree, which must include:

1. Sixty credits of course work (for students entering the program with an M.A., up to thirty credits may be transferred from another institution)

2. Completion of distribution requirements within and outside concentration areas listed below

3. Thirty credits of dissertation courses (ENG 9991, 9992, 9993, 9994) taken in consecutive academic year semesters following the completion of regular course work and the Qualifying Exam

4. All courses must be at the 7000- or 8000- level; permission from the Director of Graduate Studies is required to take courses at lower levels unless such courses are required by the English Department (e.g., ENG 6001, Pedagogical Practicum I, or ENG 6004, Pedagogical Practicum II, for graduate teaching assistants)

Academic Scholarship: All course work must be completed in accordance with the academic procedures of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and the Graduate School governing graduate scholarship and degrees: see the sections of this bulletin under Academic Regulations for the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and Academic Regulations, Graduate, respectively.

Course Requirements: The Ph.D. program has three concentrations: Literary and Cultural Studies; Rhetoric and Composition Studies; and Film and Media Studies. Each doctoral student must select a concentration early enough in her or his program to fulfill the course distribution requirements.

1. All new Ph.D. students are required to take an introductory course (ENG 7001, Issues in Critical Theory) in their first semester of studies. Accordingly, ENG 7001 is offered every Fall term.

2. Each student must take at least two courses in his or her concentration, usually at the 7000-level. These courses provide students with a broad coverage of representative texts and issues.

3. Each student also must take at least two courses outside her or his concentration. Courses taken outside the concentration are usually at the 7000-level and may be selected from the other two English Department concentrations or from other areas of English Department graduate study (linguistics, creative writing, etc.).

4. Each student must then take at least two 8000-level seminars in her or his concentration. 8000-level seminars are more specialized explorations of a research problem within a professor's area of expertise.

5. Each student must take at least one course focused on contemporary pedagogical theory and best practices in teaching (e.g., ENG 6002: Teaching of Literary and Cultural Studies, ENG 7064: Teaching of Writing, or ENG 7065: Writing Technologies). Consult the Director of Graduate Studies for a list of approved classes.

6. Each Graduate Teaching Assistant must take ENG 6001, Pedagogical Practicum I, in the first semester in which she or he holds the assistantship, and ENG 6004, Pedagogical Practicum II, in the second semester in which she or he holds the assistantship. Accordingly, ENG 6001 is offered every fall term and ENG 6004 is offered every winter term.

Foreign Language Requirement: Students are required to demonstrate a reading knowledge of at least one foreign language. The preferred method for demonstrating proficiency is to pass a translation examination. For further details, consult the Director of Graduate Studies.

Final Qualifying Examination: One year before she or he plans to take the Qualifying Examination (QE), each student meets with her or his advisor to declare the field and emphasis in which she or he plans to be examined. Designated fields reflect the current division of the discipline as published by the Modern Language Association. Emphases are designed to underscore the necessity of embedding doctoral work in ongoing critical debates among the various disciplines and sub-disciplines that make up English studies. An emphasis should identify a topical or thematic category and/or articulate a theoretical or methodological approach. Students will also need to list two (or more) courses that support the declared emphasis. The student writes a brief description of her or his field and emphasis and the dissertation director presents this to the Department Graduate Committee. The Graduate Committee selects the other two members of the QE Committee. The QE Committee then works with the student to construct a list of texts on which she or he is to be examined (roughly 100-120 texts). The exam itself should be scheduled no later than the semester following the completion of course work. The QE Committee composes questions for a six-hour written examination. Within one week after taking the written exam, the student then takes a ninety-minute oral examination. The student passes or fails the exam in its entirety. No later than one month after successful completion of the Qualifying Examination, the student selects a dissertation committee consisting of three members of the English Department graduate faculty and one appropriately qualified individual who is not a member of the English Department. Members of this committee may or may not have been members of the student's QE Committee.

A final Public Lecture Presentation-Defense, after the dissertation has been completed, is also required. For a description of this, see Dissertation Public Lecture Presentation-Defense.

Financial Aid

General sources of financial aid for graduate students may be found in the section on Graduate Financial Assistance, beginning under Financial Assistance, Graduate of this bulletin.

 

Assistantships: Departmental assistantships are awarded on a competitive basis to doctoral students. Assistantships are awarded each spring and take effect the following fall. Inquiries and applications should be addressed to the Director of Graduate Studies. 

  • Albert Feigenson Endowed Memorial Scholarship: Award open to full-time students majoring in music or English, with high scholastic standing and demonstrated financial need.
  • Professor Arnold Goldsmith Annual Scholarship: Award open to all full-time undergraduate and graduate students in English who maintain a 3.0 g.p.a. and demonstrate financial need.
  • Christopher T. Leland Endowed Scholarship in Creative Writing: Award open to full-time and part-time graduate and undergraduate students who exhibit achievement in creative writing.
  • Dennis Turner Memorial Scholarship in Film Studies: Award open to full-time students demonstrating a strong interest in film studies and maintaining a minimum 3.0 g.p.a.
  • DeRoy Fellowship: Award open to students entering the Ph.D. program. Students with an interest in film and media studies are especially urged to apply, but the fellowship is open to all entering students and is awarded on the basis of academic performance and promise.
  • Doretta Burke Sheill Endowed Memorial Scholarship: Award open to students majoring in English with high scholastic achievement, character, leadership, and financial need.
  • Loughead-Eldredge Endowed Scholarships in Creative Writing: Award open to M.A. students in creative writing who are in good academic standing and are enrolled for at least six credits.
  • Pearl Applebaum Warn Endowed Scholarship in English: Award open to returning full- or part-time students twenty-seven years and older, with high scholastic achievement and demonstrated financial need.
  • Stephen H. Tudor Memorial Scholarship in Creative Writing: Award open to full-time degree-seeking students majoring in English who have completed at least fifteen credits in residence and demonstrate high achievement in creative writing.
  • Terrance King Endowed Memorial Fellowship in English: Award open to an exceptionally promising Ph.D. student, based on the quality of the dissertation project.
  • Thomas R. Jasina Endowed Scholarship in English: Award open to full- or part-time students with high achievement and demonstrated financial need.

 

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