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Professor Nadejda Marinova Receives Tenure and Promotion

Date: 7/17/2018

 Professor Nadejda Marinova Receives Tenure and Promotion

Dr. Nadejda Marinova has received tenure and promotion to the rank of Associate Professor in 2018. She joined the Department of Political Science at Wayne State University in 2012, after serving as a Dornsife College Postdoctoral Distinguished Teaching Fellow at the University of Southern California. She holds a Ph.D. in Politics and International Relations from the University of Southern California which she received in 2011. Dr. Marinova’s research interests include diaspora and migration, Middle East politics, ethnic lobbies in foreign policy, human trafficking and the intersection of culture and gender. She has conducted field research both in Syria and in Lebanon, where she was a research affiliate at the Lebanese Emigration Research Center at Notre Dame University-Louaizé.

Dr. Marinova’s work has been published by such outlets as the Oxford University Press, Foreign Policy Analysis (as part of George Mason University’s Global Migration and Transnational Politics series) and in the International Studies Association Compendium. She is the past Communications chair (2011-2013) of the Ethnicity, Migration and Nationalism section of the International Studies Association. In March 2017, she was selected as a recipient of the 2017 President's Award for Excellence in Teaching, Wayne State University's highest teaching honor.
Her book, Ask What You Can Do for Your (New) Country: How Host States Use Diasporas, was published by Oxford University Press in the summer of 2017. Within the last few decades a body of theory and empirical analysis has emerged within the field of international relations on the connections between transnationalism and foreign policy. One aspect of this literature has involved the strategic relationship between home states and their ethnic lobbies abroad. Professor Marinova’s book develops a theory about when, how, and why states use diasporas and the ethnic lobbies they generate to advance foreign policy goals.

Dr. Marinova presents a theory in her book explaining the conditions under which a host state will decide to promote and use an ethnic lobby, and she tests it comparatively with eight cases, including: the Bush Administration's use of the American Lebanese Cultural Union and the World Council for the Cedars Revolution in developing policy towards Lebanon and Syria; the Iraqi National Congress in endorsing the US invasion of Iraq; the Cuban-American Committee's cooperation with the Carter administration in attempting to normalize relations with Cuba; and the International Diaspora Engagement Alliance (IdEA) launched by Secretary of State Hillary Clinton in 2011 to promote economic development in a number of countries. This work has already attracted widespread attention and acclaim.

The Department of Political Science congratulates Dr. Marinova on her tenure and promotion to the rank of Associate Professor!