A Sample of Alumni Accomplishments in Creative Writing

Patti Abbott

Patti Abbott has had more than 50 stories published in literary and crime fiction publications. Several stories have been included in anthologies.  She won the Derringer Award for a flash fiction story in 2008 and maintains a blog at http://pattinase.blogspot.com where I have a weekly feature on forgotten books. More than 150 writers and readers have contributed reviews. She took four creative writing workshops with Chris Leland. Her daughter, Megan Abbott, who also took a class with Chris Leland, has her fourth novel coming out in July. All four novels are with Simon and Schuster. Her last novel, Queenpin (2008), won the Edgar Award in 2008 for Best Paperback Original. She has also published an anthology A Hell of a Woman and an academic book-The Streets Were Mine (2001 Palgrave).


Jane Dobija

From 1979 to 1984, Jane Dobija studied and taught at Wayne State University, winning awards for her fiction and drama.  She wrote regularly for local media and started a literary magazine called Corridors. In 1984, she relocated to Poland, first studying  at the Jagiellonian in Krakow and then reporting from Warsaw for London’s Independent.   She filed daily for National Public Radio during the revolution and then became editor-in-chief of the weekly Gazeta International.  Later, she founded The Warsaw Journalism Center, serving as its director for seven years.  Currently, Dobija lives in Los Angeles where she is writing a novel about Poland and working with the Los Angeles Public Libraries.  She and colleagues are bringing Corridors back online. (See www.corridorsmagazine.org)

Dorene O'Brien

Dorene O'Brien was born and raised in Detroit where she can still be seen taking photos of the UA Theater Building on Bagley or dining at Lafayette after researching her latest story. She has been a fiction writer for twenty years, and currently teaches creative writing at the College for Creative Studies and at Wayne State University, where she earned her MA in English. She has studied with acclaimed short story writers Peter Ho Davies and Antonya Nelson. O'Brien won the Red Rock Review Mark Twain Award for Short Fiction in 2000, was the 2002 winner of New Millennium's Fiction Award and in 2003 won the Chicago Tribune Nelson Algren Award. She won the prestigious Bridport Prize the following year and is the recipient of a creative writing fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts. Her short stories have appeared in the Connecticut Review, Clackamas Literary Review, the Chicago Tribune, New Millennium Writings, Carve Magazine, Ellipsis, Cimarron Review, Red Rock Review, Inkwell and others. She is currently working on a novel featuring fossil hunters in Ethiopia. She won the National Best Book Award for her short story collection Voices of the Lost and Found. http://www.doreneobrien.com/

Patrick O'Leary

Patrick O’Leary graduated from Wayne in 1974 with a B.A. in Journalism and a concentration in Creative Writing. His first novel, Door Number Three (TOR) was chosen by Publisher’s Weekly as one of the best novels of the year. His second novel, The Gift (TOR) was a finalist for the World Fantasy Award and The Mythopoeic Award. His third novel The Impossible Bird (TOR) made the shortlist for the Nebula Award. Other Voices, Other Doors (Fairwood Press) was his first collection of fiction, essays and poetry. His poetry has appeared in literary magazine across the country and was chosen for the 17th Annual The Year's Best Fantasy and Horror.  His short stories have appeared in Postscripts, Mars Probes, and Infinity Plus One, Scifiction.com, The infinite Matrix, Electric Velocipede, and Conjunctions 39: The New Wave Fabulists.  His newest collection of short stories The Black Heart was published in 2009. His novels have been translated into German, Russian, Japanese, Polish, French and Braille. His work in advertising has won numerous industry awards. He makes his home in Troy, Michigan.


Tyrone Williams

Tyrone Williams teaches literature and theory at Xavier University in Cincinnati, Ohio. He is the author of two books of poetry, c.c.(Krupskaya Books, 2002) and On Spec(Omnidawn Publishing, 2008). He also has several  chapbooks out, including AAB (Slack Buddha Press, 2004), Futures, Elections (Dos Madres Press, 2004) and Musique Noir (Overhere Press, 2006).  The Hero Project of the Century was published in 2009, followed by Adventures of Pi and Howell in 2011.  His website is located at the following link: http://home.earthlink.net/~suspend/


Michael Zadoorian


Michael Zadoorian is the author of two novels, The Leisure Seeker (William Morrow, 2009) and Second Hand (W.W. Norton, 2000), and a story collection, The Lost Tiki Palaces of Detroit (Wayne State University Press, 2009). He is a recipient of Columbia University’s Anahid Literary Award, the Michigan Notable Book award, the Great Lakes Colleges Association New Writers Award and was finalist for the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award. He has published works in The Literary Review, Beloit Fiction Journal, American Short Fiction, North American Review and Detroit Noir. Born and raised in Detroit, he now lives in Ferndale, Michigan. He is a 2013 recipient of the Kresge Artist Fellowship in the Literary Arts.  http://www.michaelzadoorian.com



 

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