Field teaching is integral to understanding terrestrial ecology for a variety of reasons.  Learning in the uncontrolled, often chaotic natural world forces students into an unfamiliar environment and asks them to interpret what they see around them.  At an urban university like Wayne State, teaching and learning in the field is especially important as it provides opportunities for students who may have minimally interacted with the natural world.  Below is a sample of photos illustrating the field experiences our lab has provided for undergraduates and graduate students at Wayne State.  Right click on the photo and select "view image" to expand it; select "view image info" for description.

 

 

Terrestrial Ecology course, Fall 2018

After the Bog!

Crossing the bridge at Radrick Forest

Viewing the large depression at Mack LakeLearning the clinometer for tree heights

 Discussing tree architecturePort Huron till at the Good Aspen siteCreek crossing

 Soil pit at Field Exam IWhich hickory?

 

 It happens.

 

 

Terrestrial Ecology course, Fall 2016

                                        

 

 

Terrestrial Ecology course, Fall 2014

After the bog hike!

 

Saturday morning, 7 am, poor aspen Port Huron till texture testChecking out a 2012 burnDoing soil texture with a brokencollarbone - pure dedicationReindeer lichen tastes great - seriously!The bog is wet.What is this landform?Soil pits rule!

 

 

Trees and Shrubs course, Fall 2013

Taking a break during the field midterm, Maybury State Park

On the Huron River floodplainWhat is this plant?????????????95 degrees this day in September!

REALLY raining at the bog. . . . wet even before we start!Black oak inner bark is bitter.Hiking through the woods to plant #27 for the week.

 

 

Terrestrial Ecology course, Fall 2012

 Sampling Port Huron till at UM Biological Station

Creek crossingStudying hemlock in northern MichiganMeasuring tree heights in aspen stand, northern MichiganSwamp trompThinking about serotiny, Mack LakeOne impressive soil pit!

 

Terrestrial Ecology course, Fall 2010

Resting at the giant hemlock tip-up, northern Michigan


Sampling old growth red pine, northern MichiganCold morning!Hiking to Burt Lake by noon.Apples and waders en route to the bog.Extracting a student from the bog

 

Biology of Trees & Shrubs course, Fall 2008

Taking a break during the field exam

Amanda checking inner bark of an elmStudying silt on the Hurpon River floodplainWhich hickory is it?Amand sinks into the bogI love trees!Identifying a walnut in wet goldenrod.

 

Biology of Trees & Shrubs course, Fall 2007

Group photo after traversing the bog.

Examing an ash in the first labField examWhat is this shrub?Resting during the field exam.This tree could be anything - and it's dark!

 

Terrestrial Ecology course, Fall 2014

After the bog hike!

 

Saturday morning, 7 am, poor aspen Port Huron till texture testChecking out a 2012 burnDoing soil texture with a brokencollarbone - pure dedicationReindeer lichen tastes great - seriously!The bog is wet.What is this landform?Soil pits rule!

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