I am an aquatic ecologist interested in the ecological and evolutionary processes that determine the structure and stability of populations and communities. My work focuses on freshwater planktonic systems (zooplankton and phytoplankton) and makes use of a variety of empirical approaches including field observations and experiments in both laboratory and field settings.I also occasionally dabble with mathematical models.

Current areas of interest include:

  1. the impacts of dispersal, invasion history and enrichment on species diversity and compositional turnover (in space and time)
     
  2. the effects of prey heterogeneity and weak trophic interactions on trophic structure and predator-prey dynamics
     
  3. the effects of dispersal on population persistence, species diversity and community-level stability in environmentally forced metacommunities
     
  4. the effects of environmental forcing and dispersal on the genetic diversity and clonal dynamics of Daphnia pulex populations.

 

Dr. Steiner's Background

2014: Associate Professor, Wayne State University, Department of Biological Sciences

2008-2014: Assistant Professor, Wayne State University, Department of Biological Sciences

2005-2008: Postdoctoral Research Associate, Michigan State University, W. K. Kellogg Biological Station.

2004-2005: Postdoctoral Research Associate, University of Illinois, Department of Animal Biology.

2002-2004: Postdoctoral Research Associate, Rutgers University, Department of Ecology,Evolution and Natural Resources.

2001: Postdoctoral Research Associate, University of Chicago, Department of Ecology and Evolution.

2001: Ph. D., Michigan State University, W. K. Kellogg Biological Station, Department of Zoology, and the Ecology, Evolutionary Biology and Behavior Program.

1992: B. S., University of California, Los Angeles.  Major: Biology

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